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Archive for the ‘In the Media’ Category

online salesWhen trying to keep up a blog, the worst thing you can do is take  a few days off. Unfortunately, some craziness has been happening over here, and I’ve had to take care of a few things before I could come back to The Galley.

With the holidays here, we could all use some extra cash, especially those of us who are unemployed and starting to freelance. Here’s a post I wrote for Cheapiness.com on sites that sort through all kinds of online deals to bring you the best ways to save on the net:

There’s so much info on the web, it’s time consuming to search through it all to find what you are looking for— especially when your time is money, and you are trying to save some.

Geek Like Me has saved you the trouble of deal hunting, and found some sweet sites for bargain shopping.

  • Woot.com feature’s a different product everyday at prices you may never find anywhere else. Geek Like Me suggests getting on the site early in the morning, since there are only so many of the featured product available. Today’s is a Pentax 12 megapixel digital camera, for $119.99!
  • GottaDeal.com has deals on, well, pretty much everything. Score on tech goods (like Kingston 8GB Secure Digital High Capacity (SDHC) Card for less that $14 bucks) to cutting boards, and you can even get the great prices on the go with their mobile website.
  • SickDeals.net is a bargain hunter’s paradise due to it’s variety of deals. Get Candy Land for $4.99 and relive some childhood memories on new (and cheap) throws and rugs.

Since stores have been posting not so great sales numbers, the Wall Street Journal says many stores are going to have some “massive” discounts to try to lure us last minute shoppers in. Be sure to keep your eyes peeled for after Christmas blow-out sales, too!

Happy Holidays!
-C

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bookEveryone seemed to like my reading suggestions last week, so let’s keep this new feature going. When I search the web for content, I’m looking for writing advice, where to find gigs, increasing my network, career advice, ideas for this blog, media trends and news, ideas for freelancing and budgeting, and ideas for the clients I already work for. This explains the random range of articles that I’ll feature on “What to Read.” Keep sending me what you are curious about, and I’ll keep finding awesome and educational reads. Here is double the amount from last week’s “What to Read,” from giving gifts with meaning to networking tips and 100 places to find a job.

  1. Social Media Predictions 2009– Exactly what it sounds like and you can download a sweet .pdf. Hint: Web 2.0 is about passion and quality, not quantity (though that is important, too).
  2. How to Blog and Grow Rich– Makes it sound easier than it is, but some helpful tips.
  3. Are all Bloggers Journalists?– A very personal and interesting take on this endless debate.
  4. How to Give Gifts Unconditionally– A very sweet take on cheap and thoughtful gifts (and just in time for you holiday procrastinators).
  5. 8 Job Interview Tips– They are a bit obvious (like looking the interviewer in the eyes), but these gentle reminders are still key interview rules, and this article is nice crash course.
  6. How to Update Your Resume– Again, some are gentle reminders, but all are very important. These tips (like preparing a separate resume to tackle salary history questions), are a great place to start if you are beginning to revamp your resume.
  7. Personal Branding Lessons from an Advertising Exec– Great tips like, “Define and articulate your vision, mission, and message” and my personal favorite, “Learn and grow professionally.”
  8. Top 100 Blogs– If you are trying to get a new job, freelance write or blog, you NEED to be reading these. This is what the world is talking about.
  9. 100+ Places to Find a Job– Comprehensive list of sites to find gigs ranging form education to tech. Lists career building sites as well, and explains briefly what they all can do for you.
  10. Networking Tips– Been following @DailyCareerTips on Twitter. This is last week’s roundup. My fave: “When asking to network, don’t ask for appt convenient to you ask for a time that is “amenable to them across the next few weeks.” If you are on Twitter, I would follow them!

Till Tomorrow,
C

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ear
(Ok, failed attempt on posting twice in one day. But I was so close…)

Yesterday, while blogging to you about what job articles you should check out, I was hanging in Montclair State University‘s Audiology Department with my ear-loving pal, Raia. She needed some extra observation hours, I’ve got some free time and before you know it, people were prodding my little ears with foreign tools (the good news is I actually woke up on time, so there was no need for Raia to throw pennies at my window).

According to trusty source Wikipedia, an audiologist is “a healthcare professional specializing in identifying, diagnosing, treating and monitoring disorders of the auditory and vestibular system portions of the ear.” That means (most simply speaking) that they deal with inner ear balances issues (think vertigo), deafness, hearing loss, aids and implants.

A second year audiology student was playing with my ears and testing my hearing for about 40 minutes while Raia observed the whole shebang. Since I’m as curious as a cat (a fine characteristic of a good journalist if I do say so myself), I asked a whole bunch of questions from “What is this in my ears? It really itches” to “Explain why you used this specific pattern of words for me to repeat—what do these particular sounds indicate?” My intense curiosity prompted the actual audiologist in the room to suggest to Raia that I apply to the program.

Although this was quite a nice compliment and I love the cochlea as much as the next guy, I can’t help but think such a drastic career change six short months after graduating college is not a good idea. Sure, I went to college thinking I was going to be an M.D., studied pre-med (and cried myself to sleep three weeks into Bio 101) and have dealt with medicine and science in my real life, my whole life (I have a parent with a chronic disease), but does that mean I’m to abandon my editorial dreams and give it all up for the ear? Yes, it would fulfill my desire to help others but what about media?

I shrugged off the audiologist’s and Raia’s compliments on my research abilities and intelligence. Then earlier tonight I was doing my nightly tweets, when I stumbled upon U.S. News & World Report’s Best Careers 2009. There it was—audiology—in slightly large, bold print. Was this a sign?

It’s scary to see the media world morphing and collapsing faster than any of us can comprehend, but as silly as it may sound to others, I know I’m not going anywhere. I’m riding this crazy storm out. People still need the news. People still want information. As long as there is that need, the media will stick around in some form or another, and I truly believe that.

No matter where you are in your career, have you been thinking/fantasizing about doing something else in this economy? How are you handling it?

Till tomorrow,
C

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With my friend Alana at the Statue of Liberty

With my friend Alana at the Statue of Liberty

I was watching the Hulk tonight with my family, and instead of just enjoying the sound of the green man himself running through my living room (thanks to our crazy subwoofer), I was thinking about New York City. How many films have been made about New York, or take place in New York or completely destruct and demolish the twice-named town?

The Hulk was no exception (though there was destruction in Brazil and Virgina as well). As good green guy Edward Norton fought the evil green guy—the one that looked like the Hulk swallowed a stegosaurus and some fish skeletons—on the streets of Harlem, I thought about a New York that wasn’t featured in the movies. With all the problems of the “global economic meltdown” and job losses affecting this city, will we still be the star of flicks and the “capital of the world” (as one nice Italian street merchant once told me while painting my face for Carnivale, in Venice)? Would he still think that 50 years from now?

If you work in NYC or anywhere for that matter, you may find yourself trying to find work just for health benefits, living in fear of the pink slip, job searching after being laid off or contemplating a buyout offer. Though I usually concentrate on life after lay off (hmm I should copyright that phrase), some of you have written to me asking about buyout offers. If you are looking for some sound advice, check out Jenny Cromie’s (the voice behind The Golden Pencil) article on Evaluating a Buyout Offer, which appeared on Mediabistro.com this week. She talks to others about what they have done, tells you the 13 questions to ask yourself if you are considering a buyout offer and gives clear and detailed wisdom on how to handle making the decision.

Till tomorrow,
C

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sickI know this is a cop out post, but I’m sick and looking at this screen is not making it better :(. I can tell you though, that if you have freelance work to do and you are sick, it is not fun. I have to play catch-up all day tomorrow to make up for the rest today.

What do you do to stay on top of your work when you are feeling under the weather? I obviously need to be schooled in this topic.

As to not have this post completely useless, I read two articles in the WSJ this morning that not only reiterated how many people are walking unemployment stats like myself, but really made me think about how many people are being affected and are suffering.
1- The Human Toll of the Credit Crunch
2- Job Losses Worst Since ’74

In addition to my vow to post once a day, I vow to be a useful source to this community. Stay awhile, take your coat off and take a look around the site. Many, many more helpful posts to come.

Till tomorrow,
C

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quillI know these are tough times for everyone, but if you are looking for writing jobs during what I call “The Era of Confused Media,” it could be even harder to land a gig. Magazines are dropping like flies, ad dollars are disappearing from print (but not always landing on the web), newspapers are shrinking and book publishing houses are suffering, too. In a career (and job market) where there seems to be no safe haven, where do you turn to?

I turn to my favorite sites. Here is a list, in no particular order, that I visit religiously for job leads, reference and tips and tricks for making it in media.

  • Mediabistro.com– For media news, jobs, comings and goings, mastheads, classes, video. I’m an AvantGuild member and it is worth every penny.
  • Ed2010.com– A comprehensive site for all things magazines. Great for writers looking to break in to the industry. Resume/cover letter advice, glossary of terms, job leads, internships, interviews with editors, classes and happy hours.
  • AboutFreelanceWriting.com– For creative ideas, job postings and killer writing advice.
  • ProBlogger.net– Great source for learning about social media in general. Tips for bloggers all across the board, advice on design, making money, promotion, advertising, etc.
  • CopyBlogger.com– Resource for bloggers, but great tips for writing in general, like overcoming writer’s block and how to avoid grammatical errors.
  • TheGoldenPencil.com– For freelance writers, this site has interviews, advice on the business side of things, tips on book proposals, the economy, ghost writing and more.

Hope these are useful to you. Share some of your favorites with us, too!

Till tomorrow,
C

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Yesterday I wrote about using Twitter to market yourself and network for your job search. One of blogs I linked to for tips on this, JobMob, commented on the post and suggested I let you know what tips I find helpful and actually use. I’m still very new to Twitter, but these beginner methods have proved advantageous to me. Be sure to check out yesterday’s links for a more comprehensive list of ideas.

Getting Started on Twitter and Actually Being Visible

1- Find your friends. Every guide to Twitter has a different take on this. Some suggest finding Tweeters (twitter users in twitter lingo) with common interests first, others suggest following Tweeters that follow you back and some say don’t follow your friends off the bat. I found some friends first, which lead me to other friends via my friend’s followers. Your goal is to follow users and have followers, too and following your friends is a great start. (That is a lot of following…)

2- Follow your heart. After I started tweeting and found some friends, I branched out to tweeters with common interests. Since I’m interested in publishing, I followed tweeters like Anne Wayman (the writer behind AboutFreelanceWriting.com), News Recruiter which tweets about people coming and going in jobs in the media world and of course, The New York Times. I also followed tweeters out of my leisure interests as well, like the New York Giants—all work and no play would make Charlotte a dull girl.

3- Tweet a whole bunch of updates. Now that you are part of the Twitterhood, be an active member! What are you doing? I like to link to blog posts that will interest my followers, like my post on making your own way in a rough economy. I can link to articles I’ve written and want to share, sites I find helpful and even talk about an interview I’m going to go on. You can ask for advice, link to your web page and really get yourself out there by finding more followers that will have an interest in your content. A fun tweet once in a while is good too. You might be tweeting via a machine, but you are still human.

4- Auto-follow your followers. I use the service TweetLater so I can automatically follow people who follow me. This will increase your immediate community and expose you to more people. Be sure to check every once in a while for spammers and people who aren’t really contributing to your conversations.

5- Don’t be afraid of Twitter Directories. Use directories like TwitDir, Twellow and Just Tweet It to find professionals in your industry to follow. This will not only help keep you up to date with industry news, but increase your real life network once you get a dialogue going with them.

6-Take a walk around your new ‘hood. Like moving to a new place, you need to get out and explore. Twitter is still pretty new, so even though a tweeter has 11,000 followers, they are still new in town, too. Use Twitter Search to scope out what’s going on and search relevant keywords (to your interests, industry, etc.) to see who comes up, and follow the ones that stand out and offer information to you. Twitter can be a job/marketing tool and enjoyable at the same time—so get out there and tweet!

(Special thanks to Jacob from JobMob for the blogging tip!)
Till tomorrow,
C

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